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Wonton Mee 

 Wonton Mee

[ Wonton Noodles ]

      INGREDIENTS :

  • lb Chinese 'red' barbequed pork [Char Siu, in Chinese dialect], sliced

  • 8 'coils' [individual portions] wonton noodles [Chinese thin egg noodles]

  • 16 cups chicken stock [you can make your own clear chicken soup or use a good store bought chicken stock]

  • lb Choy Sum [also called Chinese Chard, Chinese Flowering Cabbage or Bok Choy Sum] [Sawi Manis in Malay], cut into bite-size [Substitute: bok choy or your favorite leafy greens]

  • 2 stalks scallions, finely chopped [optional]

  • 4-6 fresh green Serrano chilies, finely sliced [Substitute: 2-3 fresh jalapenos] [optional]

  • cup white vinegar [optional]

       INGREDIENTS for Wontons:

  • lb fresh minced [chopped] fairly lean pork

  • 40 wonton skins [more or less]

  • 1 egg

  • 3 cloves garlic, finely mashed or pounded

  • inch ginger, finely grated

  • 1 tbsp oyster sauce

  • 2 tsp soy sauce

  • 1 tbsp corn flour

  • tsp white pepper

  • tsp salt

  • 1 tsp corn flour combined with 2-3 tbsp water, for sealing wonton skins [Stir well just before use]

FYI : The spelling for 'Wonton' varies in different parts of the world - Won Ton, Wan Ton, Wanton, Wan Tan and Wantan. The common spelling in USA is 'wonton'. Wonton noodles [mee] can be found in the refrigerated section of most Oriental grocery stores. The 'fresh' noodles are lightly coated in flour and 'coiled' into individual portions for easy serving [usually 8 in a package]. Dried wonton noodles may also be available - which require a longer blanching or cooking time.

 

 
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        To Prepare Wontons:

  • In a bowl combine minced pork, egg, garlic, ginger, oyster sauce, soy sauce, corn flour, white pepper and salt
  • Put a heaped teaspoonful of pork into the center of a wonton skin, lightly dab the edges with the corn flour & water 'glue'. Bring the corners together, give it a twist sealing out as air as possible [Best made ahead of time and refrigerated]

        To Prepare :

  • [Optional] finely slice green Serrano chilies, add white vinegar, set aside in a condiment dish
  • In a stockpot, bring chicken stock to a boil, then lower heat to keep hot
  • In a large pot, bring water to a rapid boil, blanch choy sum until just al dente, strain well, set aside for garnish
  • In the same boiling water, using a 'spider sieve' cook wonton noodles one coil at a time for a min or so, remove from boiling water, dip into a bowl of fresh water before dipping into the boiling water again
  • Drain well and put into individual serving bowls
  • In the same boiling water, carefully drop in a few wontons at a time, cook for 2 mins or so [test one for doneness]
  • Pour hot chicken soup stock over noodles, garnish with a few wontons, sliced roast pork, blanched choy sum and chopped scallions
  • Serve hot immediately, and if preferred, a condiment of sliced pickled green chilies on the side

 

Variation : For 'Dry' Wonton Mee - blanch noodles, drain then toss well with a 1-2 tsp sweet dark soy sauce and a few drops of sesame oil. Garnish with sliced roast pork, choy sum and wontons; or serve the wontons in a small bowl of chicken soup with chopped scallions. 'Dry' Wonton Mee is sometimes referred to as Kon Lo, Konlo or Kon Loh Mee.

Cook's Note : Char Siu is Chinese barbequed pork; sometimes simply called Chinese roast pork. Its distinguishing color is red, supposedly from the barbeque sauce marinade. It is readily available in most Chinese restaurants and Noodle shops - the ones where you see barbequed or roasted ducks and chickens hanging in the window.

There are brand name readymade 'Char Siu Sauce' which can be found in most Oriental grocery stores; and in the ethnic, Asian or Oriental aisle of your supermarket. To make your own Char Siu - buy a whole loin of pork, marinate overnight in char siu sauce. Barbeque or slow roast in the oven, basting often with the sauce. When cooked, allow to rest and slice into thin strips. 

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
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